Checking the Drain Systems when Purchasing a Home

16 December 16

Purchasing a home in Central Florida can be a wonderful experience.  With many beautiful communities to choose from, home buyers will find it extremely difficult to choose from all of the options available.  While finding the good and the bad with a community as a whole is quite easy for a home buyer to see, there are many things with a home, specifically, that are often overlooked when searching for the perfect home.  Often times, the single most overlooked aspect in home buying is checking the drain systems.  With due diligence in this aspect, home buyers can save lots of anxiety, and money, in the future.

 

Fredrick Franks is a proven realtor in Ocala, Florida.  He knows what buyers should be checking, and specifically, why it is so important to check the drain systems of a prospective home.  Franks is a top realtor with Sellstate Next Generation Realty in Ocala, Florida.  “It is important to check the drainage system when you are looking to buy a home in any one of Central Florida communities,” Franks says.

 

But what exactly does this mean? Why is the drainage system so important when compared to other systems of a home? The answer is quite simple.  Often times, a faulty aspect of the drainage system will cause other systems to fail.  Overall, this can end up costing a new home buyer thousands of dollars in repairs and work that can destroy the visual and integral aspect of home and yard, or both.  Checking the drain systems

 

The first system to check is the main sewer lines that run from primary plumbing lines out of the home.  There are several problems that can come about with these plumbing lines.  Central Florida boasts a very humid environment, which can advance the speed at which these lines deteriorate.  Often times, these lines can be damaged to a point of collapse or may be at a point where the ground is seemingly holding the pipe together around it.  These lines are primarily directly under the home and jut out underground in your yard upon exit from the home.  If one of these lines collapses, extensive work under the home is required, costing you thousands of dollars and an eye sore for the immediate future.

 

How can this problem be avoided? It is actually quite simple.  A plumber can send a camera through these lines to get a first-hand look at your sewage lines.  This should be done before you make an offer on your dream home.  If a problem is discovered, the plumber can give you the best course of action.  Often times, the seller can have the problem fixed if it is a sticking point in the purchase of the home.

 

Another system to check is the water heater.  This system is quite simple to check, and is predicated on understanding the location of the heater and how a leak could affect your home.  Water heaters are manufactured to last 10 years.  Many factors can influence how long they will actually last.  Simply check the area around the water heater for signs of past leaks.  If there is flooring or drywall damage around the water heater, then you may have a problem.  Also, check the manufacturer’s labels on the unit itself.  This will tell you when it was installed and its capabilities.

 

Lastly, check the toilets.  This can be done in less than 20 seconds but is by far the most overlooked aspect by many home buyers.  There are three major things to check around each toilet.  First, check the floor around the toilet for discoloration.  Discoloration suggests a leak or runoff around the toilet.  Next, check the floor around the toilet for warping or a “soft feeling.”  These can suggest a slow leak that is damaging the flooring around the base of the toilet.  Last, check the toilet itself.  The toilet should not move.  A toilet leak is a relatively easy fix.  The problem, however, is a toilet leak that is left unfixed.

 

Drainage systems are important for homes in Central Florida.  With due diligence, a prospective home buyer can save thousands of dollars in repairs if these three drainage system aspects are thoroughly checked.

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